Wednesday, August 24, 2005

Bread Bakers, Start Your Ovens!


Freshly Baked Pain Au Levain

Yes, last month's Ten Tips For Better Bread post is finally complete!
And while I originally wrote it with freeform, crusty loaves in mind, I have realized that nearly all of these tips and techniques can be applied to practically any type of bread you want to bake, including sandwich-style pan loaves.

So if you're ready to begin baking your best loaves ever (or perhaps your first loaf ever!), just tie on your apron and click here. I thank you for your patience and look forward to hearing about your adventures. And remember--even bad homemade bread usually tastes good!

15 comments:

  1. yay! yay! did I say yay? :)

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  2. wonderful tips! Thank you. I can't wait to make bread. another yay for you!

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  3. I am really amazed by blogs, and by your bread in particular. I have been surfing on the web for about 2 hours and discovered various websites and blogs. I didn't expect to spend such a good time viewing pictures and recipes. I'm French and living in Paris though I've a small house outside the big city where I organically (it means that I let them grow as they want without anything not even a drop of water) grow my own tomatoes (old varieties: white ones, dark purple ones and some that are supposed to be striped yellow and green but are still totally green!), one cucumber, some zucchinies (4 exactly) -as you can see it's not a really extensive "farm"-and that's all folks (my lettuce have been totally eaten by voracious snails -see, we, French people, have left some alive, finally we diddn't eat them all! I love cats but we have a dog, kind of sheppard one though no ewes quite near (bit of border collie blood in our model)
    Well, I really enjoyed your blog and will keep as a favourite. Hope to hear from you someday ! As I don't really know how to proceed with the technical aspect I leave you my email: agoville@infonie.fr

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  4. I'm going to print out your tips and bring them to my local baker. Maybe then they'll figure out how to put the crunch back in their banguettes!

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  5. Thanks so much for finishing this! I'm going to print these out so I don't have to keep coming online to find them. And i'm still looking for the PERFECT wooden bowl.

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  6. Hi Clare,
    That's exactly what I said when I finally finished writing the post! : )

    Hi Wendy,
    Thank you! I can't wait to hear how your bread turns out. Happy baking!

    Hi Flo,
    Welcome to the farm! So glad you enjoyed your e-visit. Your French garden sounds wonderful, and I love your definition of "organically" grown. Sorry to hear about the voracious snails. If you haven't solved the problem yet, you might try some of the solutions I wrote about in this comments section.

    Thanks for leaving your email address. I'll write soon.

    David,
    LOL, you crack me up. I still can't believe how much bad bread you've found in Paris. What is the world coming to? Maybe Missouri will become the new bread capital of the world--ha ha ha.

    And speaking of cracking up, any of you food bloggers who haven't read David's Ten Signs You've Been Blogging Too Much post should head over there right now. Best laugh I had all week (at least)!

    Hi Amy,
    You're very welcome. Be sure to let me know what tips worked for you. And I'd like pictures, too, of course. : )

    Hi Sam,
    You're very welcome, too! : )

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  7. Thanks for the tips! I really enjoyed the read!

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  8. I have been trying to figure out how I can get me those books!

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  9. Nice to hear from you so soon. I'll keep your tip(beer+flour)concerning "voracious French snails" in mind for next year as I don't intend to grow more lettuce this year (Autumn is here! bit colder and rainier).
    Maybe you could give me another tip: I assume you grow tomatoes as I do, I assume you grow much more tomatoes than I do, so you must be an expert; Let met explain my problem to you: My tomatoes (various old species grown on the same soil) taste really great but the consistency is a bit mushy, dry and the skin is quite coarse (this, I think, comes from my spare watering) and it's really a pity to have such fabulous and good looking tomatoes with such a flaw
    Well, I am really sorry cause I won't be at home next week, I am going to spend a week in Normandy with my son and I won't be able to read your answer before September 5th. You see, I miss already the "bloggy time" I spend with you!

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  10. Bread looks awesome Farmgirl! Nice Job! Take Care. Dan.

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  11. Hi Joe,
    You're very welcome! Glad you enjoyed them.

    Hi Clare,
    No good bread books in Australia? Maybe you need to write one! : )

    Hi Flo,
    Hmmmm. I will have to do some thinking about your tomato situation and get back to you. I love the phrase "bloggy time!" Hope you have a great vacation. I'll "see" you in September! : )

    Hi Dan,
    Thanks so much!

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  12. hmmmm, organic farm, bread, photography, and cats. This is WONDERFUL!

    I'd like to link to your bread baking tips on our Slow Food blog and listserv, as well as share it with my Slow Food class, but the permalink feature doesn't seem to work. I just get the home page. Any ideas?

    Thanks, you're definitely going on my roll.

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  13. Hi Laurie,
    Welcome to the farm! I'm so glad you found us. Feel free to link, link away! I'm flattered you want to share my bread baking tips with other Slow Foodies.

    I apologize for the permalink problems. I don't know what's going on but will hopefully have it straightened out soon. In the meantime, here's the permalink for the bread tips post:
    http://foodiefarmgirl.blogspot.com/2005/07/ten-tips-for-better-bread.html

    Hope this helps! : )

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  14. I'm going to be using your tips this weekend, making my first yeast bread. I also have called the King Arthur Flour baking hotline to discuss things with them. I got a Kitchenaid Pro series to start up (licorice color), so now I'm committed! Wish me luck... And thanks for the tips!

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January 2013 update: I know word verification is a big pain, but it's the only way I can stop the ridiculous number of anonymous spam comments I get every day. I don't want to require commenters to be registered Blogger or Open ID users because I know many of you aren't. Thanks so much for your understanding!

Hi! Thanks for visiting Farmgirl Fare and taking the time to write. While I'm not always able to reply to every comment, I receive and enjoy reading them all.

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