Thursday, May 18, 2006

The Cary Chronicles: Chapter 1

Big Day For A Little Lamb


Cary takes a break in the garden.


Well, it's been one week since I became Cary's mother. And a lot has happened in those seven days. First of all, I was blown away by the incredible response to my little Mother's Day 'tail.' I had no idea Cary's story would touch the hearts of so many people. I can't even begin to explain how wonderful that makes me feel.

And yes, I have taken your suggestions about a children's book seriously and am working on making that idea become a reality. Of course I'll let you know if anything happens. In the meantime (since I'm snapping pictures of Cary like crazy--and because so many people have requested it), I figured I would post periodic updates about our life together. Like I told Cary last week, I have no idea what's going to happen. We're just taking it one day at a time. And I, for one, am cherishing every one of those days. Thank you again for your amazing kindness and support. And now back to our tale. . .

First of all, I want to mention that Cary's leg is indeed improving. She continues to hold it up when she is standing still (which isn't very often), but not as high as before. She has started putting some weight on it when she walks, and she has no trouble scampering about the farm and keeping up with me and Bear.

Since we all know the camera puts on pounds, some people are having a hard time figuring out just what size Cary is. So this morning I pulled out a tape measure, and this is what I learned: She currently stands 14 inches high. It is 18 inches from the tip of her nose to the base of her tail. And she weighs in at about 9 pounds. I think she is growing by the hour. Her twin brother is already about half again as big as she is, but that is not surprising.

As I said, a lot has been going on during this past week. On Tuesday alone (which was our first full day together, as Cary had previously been spending naptimes with Alison and her baby girl in their Bonding Suite), Cary



had her first nibble of solid food,




spent some time in the garden (weeding wears you out!),




came nose to nose with a donkey while The Nanny Bear wasn't looking, splashed fearlessly through the creek behind me without a peep of protest when I forgot to carry her across (hey, I'm still new at this),




and survived a death stare from The Doodle Monster (who is half her size).


In the afternoon, as part of her physical therapy program, she


hiked a full mile up and down our steep, wooded driveway. And at dusk, while I was standing in the front yard talking on the phone to a fellow shepherdgirl, she tried to eat a good sized rock. (Fortunately she spit it out.)

While Cary obviously enjoys traipsing around with me, she knows how important it is for a growing girl to get enough rest. So when we head into the house to do a little work on the computer, she immediately settles down for a nap in what is quickly becoming her favorite spot on the farm:



curled up next to my feet (which is where she is right now).

All in all, we spent 13 non-stop hours together on Tuesday. My favorite part of the day? When we took a break from weeding in the garden, curled up together on a bed of clover, covered our faces from the sun with my big straw hat, and happily soaked up each other's company. She won't be this little for long.

41 comments:

  1. This reminds me so much of last summer when I was visiting some friends who have a house in the countryside. One day, a baby goat just appeared on their property, and was so tame we were sure that it had been raised as a pet. Indeed, she behaved a bit like a dog; coming over for petting, rubbing against our legs, and muzzling in our laps.
    But every so often we'd get a reminder that she was, indeed, not-so-domesticated after all. We'd be in the middle of dinner, and all of the sudden this animal would take a huge leap, splayed out on the dinner table, to the surprise of all, knocking everything over and munching off our plates as fast as her little mouth could move.

    Fortunately she was eventually reunited with her owner...but we missed her (well, except during dinner.)

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  2. Hi David,
    LOLOLOLOL! I love the image of the little goat 'splayed out' on the table, inhaling your dinners. Thanks for the laugh.

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  3. Cary is quite the cutie!

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  4. David's story reminds me of the time I rescued a baby goat from a group of morons having a Bachelor Party at a strip club (don't ask, don't ask don't ask). The goat was fine hanging around my studio,I had a little bit of a yard in back, but as goats will do; it had to climb everything. Luckily the mechanic next door had a granddaughter with a big yard and the goat got a nice home.

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  5. Little Cary has a smile on her face. Must be because she loves her new mom. I can't wait for the ongoing Cary Chronicles. This has got to be the most feel-good site on the internet. Thank you. It's badly needed.

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  6. Your Cary Chronicles are wonderful. I can see her curled up at your feet in your office.

    Your story would make a beautiful children's book. What a beautiful lesson it teaches about love, kindness, family, diversity. I'm going to print off your first one and read it to my kiddos.

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  7. one more thing ...

    "When the day came for the three of them to leave the Bonding Suite and graze in the fields with the rest of the flock, the little girl stayed close to her twin brother and felt safe."

    Your voice here and the photo you used for this of the Cary and her brother surrounded by green remind me so much of the kids story of Ferdinand the Bull.

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  8. I must agree that you should make this into a Children's book (or series!). It is such a wonderful story.

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  9. Charming, charming picture, farmgirl! She looks so velvety and soft and yes, cute and adorable. Super adorable!
    PS/ Ferdinand the bull was my absolute favorite book as a child.
    Ferdinand, sitting quietly under the cork tree with his beloved Mother, a treasured picture.

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  10. How funny... like others, I thought: childrens book!

    I love that adorable photo and would you look at those chives!! WOW!

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  11. Cute pic!! Does she eat the chives? (Great - a lamb with chive breath!) Is her leg getting any better at all?

    And, um, just out of curiousity, what are the future plans? Will she get to come in the house and sit under your chair when she's full grown? ;-)

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  12. i have to say that this is one of my favorite blogs - i check it everyday when i have time! so passionate, adorable, real, attached...and it makes me REALLY miss the farm i grew up on. even though i always told myself i would never ever EVER farm, lately i've been seriously thinking about doing almost exactly what you are doing...just getting a small acreage, a few cows, some chickens, sheep, goats, horses, dogs, cats, pigs, etc and do some organic gardening/farming for a living... your blog is very inspirational...keep it up and don't let the down days (b/c farming def. has those!) get you too low! thanks for the great pics and writings!

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  13. I Gallop On has the right idea! The Cary Chronicles!

    Can't wait to hear more about her.

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  14. I can completely picture her size right now - she's almost exactly the size of my miniature poodle! Such a good size to cuddle with.

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  15. Susan...thanks for the great update!...unfortunately, we fans of Cary require the same tomorrow...and the day after that...and the day after that...OK?

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  16. Hi S - Cary tried to eat a rock...she must be of friend of my Chico :)

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  17. Farmgirl, did you ever think that one day you would be adopted Mom to a little lamb so sweet at Cary? I imagine not. I know this spring has brought its ups (Cary) and downs (little losses.*sighs*) but I do so hope that the ups keep you coming back to continued tales of adventure on your wonderful farm! Thank you so much for sharing your little place with all those who have come to love it so much.

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  18. Susan...thanks for the great update!...unfortunately, we fans of Cary require the same tomorrow...and the day after that...and the day after that...OK?

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  19. Thank you so much for the update.It sounds like things are coming along very well! I am so glad for both of you. Keep up the updates, and the book is such a good idea. Just think of how many stories you could tell.

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  20. I'm glad you decided to take the book idea seriously. It looks like you already have a market for it. I'll buy a couple!

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  21. She's quite the brave lambie to survive the Doodle Monster!

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  22. If you make a book I want to draw the illustrations. What a nice story.

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  23. The lying-on-the-stocking-feet-under-the- computer position is a favorite spot for my cats, too. It is very nice when they lean their heads confidingly against your leg.

    I'm afraid that in addition to acquiring a lamb-child you have also acquired a very demanding audience. We will be nagging you for Cara updates relentlessly.

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  24. I have to confess that I try not to leave comments here every day. Or else I'd look like a stalker.
    But I cannot resist the story of Cary. You're doing such a great thing.

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  25. Cary is so sweet and she is lucky to have a caring mom now!

    I particularly love the picture of her in the woods and, of couse, your other animals are very sweet too!...

    Whenever I go on your site, I end up daydreaming about the beautiful place you live in, the kind of life you live (out of the frantic world) and the animals you have! I always wanted to have farm animals (dogs, donkeys, goats, etc...)....

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  26. Dear Susan, I can acknowledge word by word what Rosa says. Your site always makes me dream, and I love to return and to find some more stories about your cute baby lamb. It always so astonishing to learn how animals can adapt their lives when they find a person they want to live with. Looking forward to more ! I wish you all luck in the world for you and your baby and many more naps under the strawhat to come...

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  27. I'd like to place my order now for Cary's first book...I know my nieces would love a copy!

    And, wow, I never realized lambs were so small!! She's barely over a foot tall? Ok, I think I need to see one in person sometime so I can better visualize these stories... Calves I've seen in person, but never lambs.

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  28. Delightful site - and the continuing saga of the baby lamb is a joy! We raise goats and certainly know the peaks and valleys of livestock. Our beautiful little baby goats DO grow up - David's story about the goat in the house should be a caution - all animals are indeed NOT created for housesharing with humans. Enjoying the times of petting and cuddling is great for the babies - they'd normally get that from their mothers and have to have it to become well adjusted adult animals. All in all - love to read the chronicles of Cary - thank you!

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  29. Farmgirl,

    You can put me down for several coopies of that children's books when it hits the stores. I don't think there's a better lesson for children (and adults) to learn.

    Love the pictures of Cary!

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  30. She's so tiny! I am happy and relieved to hear her leg is improving.

    What a wonderous gift you've been given. Thank you for sharing it with us.

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  31. I love Cary and hope you will write that book. I'll buy it!

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  32. You and Cary. Me and Logie. (Sort of.)

    Sending love from here to there, dawl.

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  33. I discovered your site a while ago but the day that I was reading about your Cary, my dear friend of over 25 years named Cary was the innocent victim of a police chase that tragically ended his life (the bad guy ran a light and hit his car). So whenever I read about your Cary I think of my Cary.

    So thanks for writing about him and I love your site and am secretly jealous.

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  34. I am happy to have stumbled on your blog. I am going to check back often to read about Cary, Bear, Danley your cat and your realizations. Thanks so much for this beautiful blog!!

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  35. I've really like the perspective you share about country life. Thanks for taking the time to share.

    And in the 15 years I've lived in the US I've never seen or heard anyone refer to 'traipsing'. A wonderful activity and a word that my family gave me growing up but come across seldomly.

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  36. this is my first time reading your blog and it is so cute...i will have to put it in my favorites. Keep it up....

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  37. my mom would love this blog she has been looking for recipies and ill show it to her and she might leave you a comment

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  38. The choice of immages in your blog are realy eye catchy. where from you got these immages?. The goats, pets and the natural beauti is excellent.

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  39. Hi Farmgirl - I read your posts every day and love the Cary story. I lived in rural Missouri for a long time, still have a website for my high school, and love reading about your lovely rural life. I have stories to tell too, but you tell them better. Life on a Missouri farm is indeed full of adventures! I hope you continue your blog as so many of us truly enjoy it, and for me, it brings back many memories.

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  40. A friend just gave me a link to your site. As I am about to be a farmgirl myself, I was tickled to find you.

    I love you Cary stories. One of your comments reminded me of something I was told when my son was a newborn. You will always have dishes in the sink and clothes that need to be washed, but you will not always have a baby that wants to snuggle. Wise words.

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  41. I love lamb. I was just looking at a recipe for lamb burgers.
    1 lb ground lamb with shallots and 4 ounces crumbled bleu cheese.
    I just made fried lamchops last nite with fresh garlic and fresh white pepper.

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