Thursday, November 13, 2008

Thursday Farm Photos: A Wild Mushroom Feast for Your Eyes Only

These are just some of the (non-edible) wild mushrooms that popped up around the farm after some warm September rains. . .



Some grew on top of each other




One was the size of an extra-large pizza




While others were as small as a thumbnail




This one was top heavy




And this one was blue!




Some sprouted out of trees




And others grew up them




It was an amazing mycological show!

© Copyright 2008 FarmgirlFare.com, the award-winning blog it's always neat to find wild mushrooms, but it's definitely more fulfilling when they're chanterelles or morels—and for once I actually announced a contest winner when I said I would.

9 comments:

  1. Congratulations to LutheranChix on winning such a wonderful mushroom feast.

    I love the photos of the mushrooms you posted - fascinating. I can't identify edible from non-edible, so I just admire them for their strange shapes, color and size. I don't think I've ever seen a blue one though.

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  2. I find mushrooms a bit creepy, to be honest. Especially that pizza-looking one.

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  3. Great mushroom pix.
    I've always meant to take a foraging class so that I can actually tell good from bad... cuz they all look fantastic to me!

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  4. Wow! Amazing what kinds of mushrooms you get in places where it actually rains! ;) No, I love my desert, I do. It's prickly-pear fruit collection season, which is an adventure and a half. Less surprising than a crop of exciting mushrooms (barring an unexpected encounter with cactus spines or tiny glochid stickers), but definitely good.

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  5. CountryMidwife11/14/2008 5:31 PM

    Oh, dear. Please everyone be careful! One of my best friend's husband ate a mushroom in their yard and spent 3 weeks in ICU, nearly died and may still need a liver transplant. A healthy, young, 200 pound father of four felled by one deathcap mushroom. You CANNOT forage wild mushrooms without knowing what you are doing!

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  6. Oh, my gosh, Susan, if those were edible they'd be worth a fortune! They're lovely nevertheless.

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  7. Mushroom hunting can be really exciting- and a little scary all at the same time.
    I filmed my husband going mushroom hunting-
    you can check it out at my (old) blog: http://nadafarm.wordpres.com/

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  8. I was hoping to find pictures of edible wild mushrooms. I recognize morels, oysters. boletes, chanterelles,puffballs, and sows ears. These I eat with confidence, but am wary of knife edged varieties, though some of course are edible (buttons)I haven't been able to find a reliable source for verification. I saw some ink caps, which are edible but they were way past prime. I even had some black chanterelles grow in my basement on a wet carpet scrap-I ate it too, though they aren't common and haven't seen any since. Well, good hunting. later gnome

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