Saturday, September 19, 2009

Saturday Farm Photos: Bye Bye Sheep Barn!


Wednesday, 8:30 am







9:30 am



10:15 am



11:05 am







11:45 am







11:57 am
















Auntie Rose isn't the only one around here who's surprised by the sudden change of scenery. One minute my hunky farmguy was saying we really need to rebuild the sheep barn before it falls apart even more, I said, "It's not that bad yet, is it?" then idly wondered aloud if maybe our Amish carpenter neighbors (whose front yard produce stand has been supplementing our kitchen garden bounty) would be interested in taking on the job, and the next thing I knew measuring was under way, dates had been set, a guy from the electric company arrived to disconnect the power down there and put a new breaker box on the pole, we ordered a whole bunch of rough cut siding from the nearby Amish sawmill, large piles of money were handed over to the lumberyard and metal roofing manufacturer, a horse and buggy pulled up, and our beloved little sheep barn had been flattened (except for the rock walled feed room which we're saving).

Now all they have to do is build it back up! More photos to come.

In the meantime, want to take a peek at past barn pictures?
10/2/05: Where Sheep Sleep
10/17/05: Fall Color by the Barn
10/27/05: Where Sheep Sleep, Take Two
11/10/05: Where Sheep Sleep, Take Three (the Frosted Edition)
12/3/05: Same Scene, New View Barn Shots
5/29/06: Sun Hits Morning Mist
11/12/06: Beyond This Door There Be Treats
12/2/06: Snowstorms & Snowfall (and Heart Rocks)
11/17/07: Random Barn Shot
3/19/08: Flood Watch
9/21/08: Last Day of Summer
12/3/08: The Notorious Scratching Post Gang

© Copyright 2009 FarmgirlFare.com, the demolished foodie farm blog where employers in cities may be encouraged to provide on site daycare, but out here you need to have buckets of fresh water and a spot for your workers' horses to hang out—preferably with some nice tasty grass growing in it (see the fourth photo above).

18 comments:

  1. Wow, now that is some fast action. No wonder that sheep looks lost.

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  2. Cant wait to see what it will look like with the stone wall.
    I love reading your farm adventures, you are a very brave young lady.

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  3. Ah, to have an actual barn . . . my husband's big dream. Of course, if we had a real barn, we would inevitably have many, many more sheep. So I'm okay with our little sheds. Sure would be nice to have power and water in them, though.

    Are they re-using the framing lumber?

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  4. Fun to watch REAL workers isn't it? Reassuring to know there are still people who do the work they are hired to do - and do it well. Exciting for the sheep but poor Auntie Rose really is confuzzled isn't she?

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  5. The sheep looks so confused! I hope she accepts the replacement.

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  6. I love the way Auntie Rose is looking one way, then the other, then ahead, and then leaves.

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  7. How exciting! I'd love to have a new barn for goats! We're still working on the "Hen Hilton". Should be finished in Oct. since my husband only gets to work on it every now and then. Perhaps the goat house will be a late winter project.

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  8. It looks like a lot of happy memories were made in that barn:)

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  9. Love the adventure. Can't wait to see the new barn. Hope it goes up as quickly as the old one came down...

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  10. bo peep! where will your sheep be? how you captured poor Auntie Rose's confusion. i think i might have stayed out there all day and watched the takedown. amazing.

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  11. Wow! Very fun. Reminds me of years ago when I tore down a shed in my backyard.

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  12. Looking forward to future posts on the building of your new sheep barn!

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  13. The uncut timber logs for posts was neat to see. I hope the build goes well, please do keep us updated on the progress.

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  14. Wow! I got all excited scanning through the pics when I got to #4, thinking you had a horse you had oddly never mentioned. Then I realized it was an Amish horse, not yours. Oh well. Anyway, good luck building the new sheep barn!

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  15. Wow! That sheep barn came down pretty quickly! Please post photos of the rebuilding.

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  16. Love the progressive shots! And thanks for the horse update...I was wondering if perhaps you'd snuck a new friend onto the farm!

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  17. How old was the old sheep barn? Are you going to use the old timber for some new use? I have seen some wonderful tables and floors which came from repurposed old barn timber. My great grandparents had a farm in Missouri in the 1800s. As I read your stories and see the pictures I have often wondered if it were in the same area.

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