Friday, January 08, 2010

Friday Dose of Cute: See Spot Grow


He Gets Bigger, and It Gets Bigger

The 2009 lambs are growing up! Want to see some littler lambies?
Lambing Season 2006 Photos & Reports
Lambing Season 2006 Part 2
Lambing Season 2006 Part 3
Lambing Season 2007 Photos & Reports
Lambing Season 2007 Part 2
Lambing Season 2008 Part 1
Lambing Season 2008 Part 2
Lambing Season 2008 Part 3
Lambing Season 2009
Lambing Season 2009 Part 2

© Copyright 2010 FarmgirlFare.com, the hungry foodie farm blog where the temperatures still keep dropping (just how low can they go? wait—don't answer that), the incoming water pipes have thankfully defrosted (for now at least), there's a small mountain of firewood sitting next to the woodstove in the living room, and our lips are still warm enough to curl into a smile at the sight of those polka-dotted eyes and ears and that adorable giant pink nose—not to mention that everexpanding spot.

5 comments:

  1. Oh, how those lambs stay warm in this insane weather that we are having. Stay warm. Keep smiling. Spring will be here before we know it.

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  2. That's a face that even more than a mom could love! Just adorable - spots and all!

    Just how cold is it? Bundle up and stay warm!

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  3. If you've already answered this, sorry .... why do some of the sheep have red-ish lines on their back?

    While I'm at it, do you have a favourite way to serve sauerkraut, or some recipes using it that you could share?

    Thank you =)

    ReplyDelete
  4. They all look happy to not be fighting through the snow for some forage. What kind of hay are they munching on there?

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  5. Hi Velva,
    It always amazes me this time of year how insulated the sheep are. They slam into me jostling for grain when I'm filling their troughs but don't feel a thing. Fortunately it's a pretty soft 'smashing' for me, too! ; )

    Hi Barb,
    I just love that big spot of his - and the ones one his face and ears always make me smile.

    Hi Darcy,
    No problem - although I'm definitely going to include this one on the Frequently Asked Farmgirl Questions page I'm working on! Those red lines on the sheep are from a marking crayon, which is just what it sounds like, a large waxy crayon you use to mark the sheep when working them, sorting them, etc.

    When we trim hooves or worm the sheep (by squirting liquid into their mouths with a drench 'gun'), we gather them up into a very small area and then proceed to grab one at a time. Once they've been worked, they get marked so we know who we've done and who we haven't. Some of the colors (like red) don't wear completely off, and if you don't know about marking them, it definitely looks a little strange!

    Hi Nathan,
    The sheep are munching on square bales of organic hay we put up ourselves each summer. It's mixed grass hay including fescue, orchard grass, and clover. You can see some Day in the Hay photos from last summer here, and you'll find lots more hay feeding photos here.

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