Thursday, May 10, 2007

Farm Photo 5/10/07: Ultimate Grilled Cheese Sandwich On Italiano No-Knead Bread


Mozzarella & Romano Grilled Cheese On Italiano No-Knead Bread
(Click here for the recipe)

Attention bread bakers and bread lovers! We're just finishing up month number two over at A Year In Bread. The three of us decided several months ago that we couldn't do this project without discussing the no-knead bread recipe that appeared last fall in the New York Times and created such a worldwide phenomenon. (Wondering what A Year In Bread is? Click here to learn more about this tasty and yeasty new project.)

With over 82,000 Google hits for "no-knead bread," there are no doubt thousands, perhaps tens of thousands, of people who overcame their fear of yeast, baked their first loaf of bread, and were thrilled with what they created. How cool is that?

But once we decided to include it, we had to figure out what to do with a loaf that's had pretty much anything you can think of already done to it. Beth ended up turning hers into a nutty oatmeal cinnamon swirl toasting bread. Kevin used his dough to make English muffins--and learned a lot in the process. I took my version of the basic recipe I've been making and gave it an Italiano twist. Then I sliced it up and made one of the best grilled cheese sandwiches I've ever eaten.

If you haven't yet heard about this no-knead bread, you're in for a simple, scrumptious surprise. If you'd like to start with my basic version (click here to see a photo), just follow the Italiano recipe but omit the herbs and spices. If you're one of the zillions of people besides me who fell head over heels for this loaf and wrote about it on your blog, leave us a link to your post in a comment at A Year In Bread, and/or post a photo at the A Year In Bread flickr group. I'm Farmgirl Susan on flickr if you'd like to add me as one of your contacts.

Just joining in? The first bread we tackled at A Year In Bread was pizza dough. You'll find my recipe here, Beth's here, and Kevin's here. And today's post is full of some of our favorite bread baking tips. So what are you waiting for? If you're ready, breadie, then come bake bread with us!


© Copyright 2007 FarmgirlFare.com, the award-winning blog where Farmgirl Susan shares photos and stories of her crazy country life on 240 remote Missouri acres - and everything's better with homemade bread.

9 comments:

  1. this looks so yummy! I wonder how it would go with artisan made (which means homemade for me) sheep's milk cheese? Inspiring!

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  2. WOW - that looks GREAT!!

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  3. That sandwich looks absolutely scrumptious. We're going to have to try that ourselves.

    Thanks for the link to the Flickr group.

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  4. Oh my gosh... your sandwich looks so delicious I can can taste the crunchy outside and the creamy inside just by looking at the picture! Thank heavens calories can't be transmitted through the blogosphere!

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  5. I have yet to make the no-knead bread. I was wondering if you think a 5 qt. cast iron Dutch Oven or a 7 qt. one is best? Several blogs have suggested the smaller size to get a taller loaf. What's your opinion?

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  6. Looking very very good...still not too sure about the NYT though, I think the method is great, but the recipe needs some tinkering. I've tried it several times but feel the crumb is too gummy for my taste.

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  7. That looks fabulous...and am going to definetly try the no-knead bread. I am sure it will be a winner in my house.

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  8. yummm! will have to try it. it looks quite similar to Bill Granger's "French Toast Pockets Stuffed With ham & Cheese" that I made for my hubby's birthday breakfast :)

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  9. Maybe I'm missing something, but I don't find an actual recipe, with ingredients and directions, for your lovely result with No-Knead Bread. I see a link to Mark Bittman's original NYTimes article and HIS recipe, and I see your comments that you changed the recipe to add more salt and "a lttile more flour" if the dough is "too sticky." But your bread was apparently baked on a baking stone, whereas the signal feature of his approach was to start with a very wet dough, and to create an oven-within-an oven by baking the bread in a covered Dutch oven, thereby creating more effective steam. Under those circumstances, what's "too sticky?" Are you actually saying that you achieved the pictured result, and a "holey" crumb, without the steam produced by a wet dough and a closed oven? Am I missing something? If your recipe is on your website, I'm not finding it. Thanks for any help.

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