Thursday, June 22, 2006

Daily Farm Photo: 6/22/06


Farms Depend On Pollinators (& Fortunately Ours Is Full Of Them)

More than 100,000 different animal species--and perhaps as many as 200,000--play roles in pollinating the 250,000 kinds of wild flowering plants on this planet. In addition to countless bees (there are an estimated 40,000 species of bees), wasps, moths, butterflies, flies, beetles and other invertebrates--perhaps 1,500 species of vertebrates such as birds and mammals--serve as pollinators. Cherish our pollinators--they mean the world to us. Click
here to learn more.

A year of Daily Photos ago:
So Often I Forget To Look Up

Oh, the joys of being on dial-up! Keep getting knocked offline every few minutes, am now connected at just 21.6 Kbps, plus Blogger has apparently gone crackerdog. You don't even want to know how long it took to post this--and it's going to look a bit odd until Blogger gets its wits back. Also, I have been unable to access my gmail accounts since yesterday morning, so any messages you sent me have not yet been received. It is definitely time to go outside, grab my pitchfork, and attack a pile of sheep manure headed for the garden!

23 comments:

  1. Hello Susan-
    I wish I had the guts to make a move to the country! I love reading about your life.

    Amanda
    Sacramento resident

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  2. I moved away from a rural-ish area to a big city across country a couple of years ago.

    I miss seeing photographs such as yours! Thank you for posting.

    I never take forgranted, the sight of a single butterfly or star filled sky now.

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  3. Love your blog, your photos, and your story! So glad I stumbled upon it, what a delight! :-)

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  4. .....nice images....my grandfather had a farm.....we rode the tractor....fed the chickens.....climbed the windmill.....it was wonderful.

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  5. Hi! I just want to say that I think your blog is really interesting! I have never lived full-time on a farm, so the things you talk about are facinating, even the little things.
    Catharine

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  6. Here's another frantic Blogger-user! Driving me nuts lately and I don't have a pile of manure to escape to...pity me!
    (And it's ADSL here but ever so slow and it eats my pictures and posts...grrrr)

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  7. We won't talk about my eyesight...but when I first saw your picture I thought it was a MORREL MUSHROOM! I miss those so much!

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  8. I have one question, Susan. Are you really just one person?!? My goodness I wish I had your energy and obvious multi-tasking abilities. Great photos, great recipes, great stories . . . a great blog. You're living my dream, so I'll definitely be back to enjoy your stories and insights.

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  9. Do Chickenz pollinate? If so, they will be demanding a Cherish-the-Chickenz Day....

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  10. Beautiful photographs, as usual. Of the recent ones I particularly like "here comes the sun" - dreamy and peaceful.
    I was reading about your fast growing arugula, and I was wondering if you know that in Italy it is called "rugola" or rucola" or "ruca" or "rughetta", and that the reason for its spelling in the US is probably due to how it sounded when pronounced by Italian immigrants, probably from southern Italy, who might say something that would sound like "a rugla" from "la rugola" ("la" means "the").
    My mother, who was Italian, always got a big kick out of seeing it called "arugula" when she shopped in a farmer's market in the US.
    I grew up in Italy, and ate a LOT of rugola - the wild variety, with the small pointy leaves and very hot flavor, which I grazed on while wandering in the garden. Yum.
    So if you are ever searching for an Italian site with recipes containing that wonderful green, you might want to try its Italian spelling: rugola.
    Ciao,
    Anna Maria

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  11. I stumbled upon your log and can I say..inspiring. I started posting recipes and want to start up some photos. I live in Peru and have photo opportunities all around me. Will be visiting to check out your recipes and more pictures another time. Beautiful blog!

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  12. I just spent two weeks vacation there in MO. at my brothers farm. The contrast between there and New Mexico, where I live is massive. I'm already ploting my move.

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  13. Thanks for posting such great pictures.

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  14. Oohhh I love your gorgeous picturesss... Thanks for sharing!

    -aurora-

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  15. Great site!

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  16. Lovely picture again Susan. Have to come here everyday to check out the latest. They're truly inspiring and this from someone who lives in deepest Devon, England, miles away from the city.

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  17. This is a very interesting blog.YOu had a very interesting life..Care to make frens? :d

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  18. lindy (the chicken)and whitey6/23/2006 5:54 AM

    Jeff-
    It would be undignified in the extreme for us to flit from flower to flower. (Not to mention there could be some problem with, er, plant smooshing, as we are nice, plump traditionally-shaped chickens).

    You may, however, pay tribute to us if you wish.Pollination isn't everything.

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  19. I'm so happy your blog was featured or I may have never discovered it. I too, made the move from Southern California, but I ended up in Texas. MO is looking good...and I'm getting itchy feet again just viewing your lovely pics. Love your blog!

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  20. muhahaha ...mutant manure!(no pics , PLEEEEZ)

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  21. That's a nice shot of the butterfly, honey. It is pictures like this that motivate others to actually donate to these causes or brings about action with in them.

    I love your photos.

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January 2013 update: I know word verification is a big pain, but it's the only way I can stop the ridiculous number of anonymous spam comments I get every day. I don't want to require commenters to be registered Blogger or Open ID users because I know many of you aren't. Thanks so much for your understanding!

Hi! Thanks for visiting Farmgirl Fare and taking the time to write. While I'm not always able to reply to every comment, I receive and enjoy reading them all.

Your feedback is greatly appreciated, and I especially love hearing about your experiences with my recipes. Comments on older posts are always welcome!

Please note that I moderate comments, so if I'm away from the computer it may be a while before yours appears.

I try my best to answer all questions, though sometimes it takes me a few days. And sometimes, I'm sorry to say, they fall through the cracks, and for that I sincerely apologize.

If you're waiting for a reply to your comment and have a Blogger profile (it's free to create one) you can check the NOTIFY ME box that is below and receive all follow up comments to just this specific post via email.

I look forward to hearing from you and hope you enjoy your e-visits to our farm!